DEATH PENALTY AND JUVENILE JUSTICE REFORM
DEATH PENALTY AND JUVENILE JUSTICE REFORM

PUBLIC INTEREST LITIGATION CLINIC
We provided a two year grant to jump start the process of developing a national Mitigation Protocol. Mitigation is the introduction of evidence at the sentencing phase of a death penalty trial by an expert, a critical part of competent and fair representation. Thus, defining what constitutes good mitigation and promoting training to increase the number of qualified mitigation specialists is essential to reducing death sentences. The Supplementary Guidelines for Mitigation culminated three years of intense national work coordinated by the Public Interest Litigation Clinic. The importance and impact of the guidelines was highlighted in the Spring 2008 Hofstra Law Review and endorsed by the Defender Services Advisory Group (which makes policy decisions respecting the defender program in the federal courts nationwide). The guidelines have already been cited in a published court opinion.

TEXAS DEFENDER SERVICE
We supported the publication of two major reports; A State of Denial: Texas Justice and The Death Penalty and Lethal Indifference: the fatal combination of incompetent attorneys and unaccountable courts in Texas Death Penalty Appeals. Through national media coverage, the Texas Defender Service was able to shine a spotlight on the inequities in the death penalty system in Texas, and focus attention on the broad range of problems with the way Texas administers the death penalty.

ELLA BAKER CENTER FOR HUMAN RIGHTS: BOOKS NOT BARS CAMPAIGN
We supported the Books Not Bars advocacy campaign to promote lasting reform of one of the nation’s worst juvenile systems. The campaign seeks to expose and end over-incarceration of youth in California and to create effective alternatives to incarceration. Using public education, grassroots mobilization, media outreach and policy advocacy, the Books Not Bars campaign exposed the human rights abuses within the California Youth Authority and the failure to provide educational and rehabilitative services to confined youth. The campaign has resulted in a 60% reduction of incarcerated young people in five years, and the closure of two youth prisons.

WISCONSIN COUNCIL ON CHILDREN AND FAMILIES
Our funding supported this organization’s juvenile justice work statewide. In the 1980’s and 1990’s many states, including Wisconsin, moved toward a model of sentencing and punishing juveniles as adults. Our funding supported research and documentation of the differences between adolescent and adult brains culminating in a report “Brain Development and Delinquency: Are Juveniles Different than Adults?” This work has proved important to advocacy groups around the country to argue for more appropriate treatment of juveniles, in order to lower recidivism rates and improve prospects for rehabilitation. The Supreme Court cited brain development research in its decision to abolish the juvenile death penalty.

MARYLAND CITIZENS AGAINST STATE EXECUTIONS
Our bridge funding to this newly professionalized organization allowed it to engage in its important work to end the death penalty in Maryland while awaiting sustaining funding from a much larger foundation.

FIGHT CRIME: INVEST IN KIDS
Our seed grant supported an intriguing idea –using the voices of law enforcement officers to advocate for improved public investment in after school care and quality programs for young people. In the intervening 12 years, Fight Crime: Invest in Kids has grown into a national, bi-partisan organization of 2,500 police chiefs, sheriffs, prosecutors, and other police leaders, as well as survivors of violence. Since 1996 when Fight Crime: Invest in Kids began its work, federal funding for after school programs has increased from $13 million to $968 million.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE JOURNALISTS
In 2003, Criminal Justice Journalists, a small nonprofit, sought help from us to start a daily news digest aimed at improving news media coverage of criminal justice issues. The group later obtained regular funding from John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City to keep the digest going. It now is sent by e-mail daily to several thousand subscribers and others see it on its website. (http://cjj.mn-8.net). As the only such comprehensive publication issued by an independent source, it is read by both journalists and criminal justice professionals.

CENTER FOR COURT INNOVATION
We provided funding in 2007 to the Center for Court Innovation for the Queens Engagement Strategies for Teens (QUEST) program to pilot a new alternative to detention program in Queens, New York. The QUEST program has garnered positive attention, including recognition from Mayor Michael Bloomberg, for its leading role in juvenile justice reform in New York City and is serving as a model for other alternative to detention programs across the city. Reducing the number of low-level young offenders by sending them to community-based counseling and probation programs gets young people back on track.

GIVEN THAT WE ARE A SMALL FOUNDATION WITH A LEAN STAFFING, WE DO NOT ACCEPT UNSOLICITED PROPOSALS.